Bosham.org: an all free Bosham website        AN ALL FREE BOSHAM COMMUNITY WEBSITE                   www.Bosham.org
Home | Gallery |About Bosham | Bosham Notice Boards | Online Magazine | NearbyMap | Link to us | Add your link  | Contact us

The Royalists of Bosham

The Royalists of Bosham (Boseham) in the first Civil War (1647)

The war was a patchy affair as both sides were ill prepared and had to recruit soldiers as they went along. Broadly speaking, Parliamentary ('Roundhead') forces were strongest in the south-east and east, while the Royalists ('Cavaliers') dominated the north, the Midlands, Wales and the West Country. In fact, most regions were divided, with villages and even families split in their loyalties.

Money was a problem throughout the war: troops often went unpaid and had to take 'free quarter' in villages, paying for shelter and food with certificates that often turned out to be worthless. Travel was difficult as the armies were laden with unwieldy equipment that frequently got stuck in lanes. As a result, areas such as Oxfordshire, Berkshire and West Yorkshire suffered almost continual fighting, while large parts of Wales, East Anglia and Kent barely saw soldiers.

Oliver Cromwell, a gifted cavalry leader, rose quickly through the ranks during the First Civil War. Having proved his brilliance at the battle of Marston Moor, he reorganised Parliament's troops into the New Model Army, recruiting 'Godly men' rather than gentlemen and imposing strict discipline.

His forces destroyed the king's main army at Naseby in June 1645. In May 1646, two months after the last Royalist army in the field had surrendered, Charles placed himself in the hands of the Scottish army. In January 1647, for the price of 400,000, the Scots handed Charles over to Parliament, who imprisoned him at Hampton Court. While a nervous and divided Parliament negotiated with the king, New Model Army radicals joined with the Levellers, a group of London intellectuals, and in the Putney Debates demanded back-pay, freedom of worship and the vote for all men.

The movement culminated in part of the army staging a mutiny, which Cromwell put down in person.

Here are the results as decreed by Parliament for a couple of Bosham Men.

First this to understand how lucky they were....

House of Commons Journal 8th December 1646

Resolved: That if any Person or Persons whatsoever, shall, from henceforth, raise Arms, or maintain Arms, against both or either of the Houses of Parliament, or their Forces, that every such Person and Persons shall die without Mercy: And that his and their whole Estates shall be confiscated.

House of Commons Journal Volume 5 20 May 1647

Resolved, &c. That this House doth accept of the Sum of Forty Pounds, of Edward Trinlett, of Boseham, in the County of Sussex, Yeoman, for a Fine, for his Delinquency: His Offence is, That he was in Arms against the Parliament: His Estate is Nineteen Pounds and Three Shillings per Annum.

Resolved, &c. That this House doth accept of the Sum of Twenty Pounds, of Thomas Pierce, of Boseham in the County of Sussex, Yeoman, for a Fine, for his Delinquency: His Offence is, That he was in Arms against the Parliament: His Estate is Twenty Pounds per Annum for Life.

"An Ordinance for granting a Pardon unto Edward Trinlett, of Boseham in the County of Sussex, Yeoman; Thomas Pierce, of Boseham in the County of Sussex, Yeoman; Thomas Kercher, of Harsley in the County of Southampton, Gentleman; William Goble, of Boxgrove in the County of Sussex, Yeoman; and unto John Fisher, of Chute in the County of Wiltes, Gentleman; for their respective Delinquencies; and for Discharge of the Sequestrations of their respective Estates; was this Day read; and, upon the Question, passed; and ordered to be sent unto the Lords for their Concurrence. "


Let no-one in Bosham henceforth, raise Arms, or maintain Arms, against both or either of the Houses of Parliament therefore !  :o)

Home page | Aerial images | More Images